Conservation

Close-up of Bengal tiger's head

Committed to Conservation

Not only is the Zoo a fun destination to see amazing animals, but it's also a place to learn about the different ways to save wildlife and habitats around the world and in your own backyard. The Amarillo Zoo strives to support and promote local and global conservation efforts. We offer a wide variety of events, programs and projects that share and instill a strong sense of environmental stewardship to more than 150,000 people annually. By educating individuals we can provide an emotional connection to wildlife and engage them in conservation initiatives.

The Zoo will continue to be a regional leader in both local and global conservation efforts and practices.

To learn more about how you can help please visit our Links page. 

Some of the conservation efforts undertaken by the Amarillo Zoo include:

Zoo volunteers presenting check for black-footed ferret conservationBlack-footed Ferret Conservation

The Amarillo Zoo is just one of a handful of zoos across the country permitted to display the critically endangered black-footed ferret. Although they once ranged across the Great Plains of North America, black-footed ferrets were at one point considered extinct. Through conservation and captive breeding efforts, the ferret is making a slow come-back. The Amarillo Zoo in conjunction with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provides both on and off-site education on the black-footed ferret and the benefits of the prairie ecosystem.

Zoo staff with tiger face paint Tiger Face Painting

Tiger populations have declined steadily over the last 100 years and today only 3,500-4,500 exist in the wild. The Bengal tiger is the most numerous with about 1,800 left in the wild. Habitat loss and poaching are the greatest threats to the survival of these magnificent cats. One way the Amarillo Zoo is contributing to tiger conservation is through face painting. YOUR donations help us support organizations who are in the field finding ways to keep the remaining 6 species of tiger from facing the same fate as the Caspian, Javan, and Bali tigers.

Monarch butterfly on butterfly bushMonarch Watch

The Zoo is a certified Monarch Waystation. This means that we provide all of the basic resources necessary for monarchs to thrive, including milkweed, shelter, and nectar sources. By planting butterfly-friendly shrubs and flowers you can encourage a wide variety of wildlife to call your yard home, including butterflies, birds, reptiles, and more.

Rain barrels outside HerpetariumHarvesting Rainwater

Rain is vital to the survival of the planet and it can be a great tool to help supplement water usage in the garden. At the Zoo we have a total of six rain barrels around the Herpetarium. With an inch of rain, all six barrels are filled to the brim (that's about 350 gallons!). Rainwater harvesting is a great way to go green in your home garden as well and rain barrels can be a simple weekend project. For easy-to-follow DIY instructions, head over to Better Homes & Gardens.

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Come visit us!

The Amarillo Zoo is located in Thompson Park. Take Hwy 287 North off of I-40, take the N. 24th Ave. exit and go West, turn right into Thompson Park and follow the signs to the Zoo parking lot.

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